Everyday Adventures: Sidewalks and Galleries

With the loosening of Covid-19 restrictions, we have traveled around the city much more. To keep safe, we look for uncrowded city streets and empty indoor venues. Museums are not popular currently, so it has been a dream to view the exhibits at our leisure, talk to the guards. We have better luck on weekdays keeping social distance, especially in popular museums. Galleries are generally good any time. [As always with the new WordPress, right click the images to view the larger version]

The GMBB, Gamuda Mall Bukit Bintang is a mall with event and art exhibit spaces, a creative community mall as their website says. This artist, Phillip Wong, creates sculptures from everyday materials.

Artwork based on culinary experiences SE Asia

In a similar way the Intermark Mall exhibited new fashions using recycled textiles.

The Fahrenheit88 Mall in Tourist/Shopping district has a marvelous gallery on the top level with interesting displays. A bus ride took us to the Kedai KL Mall near the University. It features boutiques featuring local entrepreneurs.

KedaiKL upper floor

As I write this entry at the GMBB, local illustrators invited me for a little bit of Hari Raya treats celebrating end of Ramadan Fasting.

Nasi Lemak wrapped in Banana Leaf

They have an exhibit here until the end of May and Congress coming in September.

The Illustrators

Back on the street, there is new art popping up all over the place.

The sardine curry puff must be delicious
An Indian Temple tucked underneath a major shopping complex

The REXKL is a repurposed cinema as a bookstore with art gallery, restaurants, and music venue.

In the day, the pillion rider watched movies seated where there are now books

The Islamic Arts Museum Malaysia was really interesting. There were only two or three others the day we visited so the galleries were wide open for photos. Really clear explanation and displays on Arabic writing.

Astrolabes along with books on Chess

In contrast to the Islamic Museum, an early mansion houses the Wei-Ling gallery. Very lively art works along with Exhibit catalogs dating back twenty years.

Experiments on brown wrapping paper

We’ve been to the Ilham Gallery a couple of times. It’s a smaller space in an office buiding. The lighting and area provide a good space to present works with local appeal.

Three paintings by Klang artist, Kok Yew Puah

Dad Jokes

The pillion rider asked me what I wanted for Father’s Day. How about some Dad jokes.

It is coming up on two years since we last played parents hanging out with our daughter and cooking her favorite foods. We are in Malaysia; she is in New Zealand. Our paths diverged at Nadi Airport, Fiji. Since she is not here to be embarrassed, I’ll publish ten bad jokes for everyone to groan.

  1. Here’s a new word just for today: Plagiarism. (I copied it)
  2. I find moon rocks are more delicious. They are a little meateor.
  3. I get suspicious of trees on sunny days. They seem a little shady.
  4. Bikes fall over because they are twoo tired.
  5. When Math Acorns grow up they exclaim, “Gee, Ah’m a tree.” (They probably have square roots.)
  6. I was an ugly child. When I was born, the doctor looked at me and slapped my mother.
  7. Time flies like a arrow, fruit flies like a banana.
  8. My yearly income is six figures. I’m not saying where the decimal point is.
  9. It’s apparent that this bad joke has become a dad joke.
  10. Do you speak Esperanto? “Yes, like a native.”

Remembering The Old Man

I have thought about my father, John Somerville Ruenitz, frequently as the the Covid-19 vaccines have been deployed over the last six months. He did not have a smallpox vaccination scar on his shoulder. He survived smallpox during basic training in the navy. It was the milder type, and his entire unit was quarantined for a month. The only places that I ever noticed the scars were around the knuckle joints of his hands.

My father would be 111 this month. He liked to boast his birthday on the 25th was the farthest day from Christmas. No chance of aunties giving him a gift for both birthday and the holiday. After graduating from William Mitchell Law School, he was a lawyer for over 40 years in Windom, Minnesota. For a while, his law office had the distinction of having the first phone number, #1. And I could go on and on with the stories and how they affected me throughout my life.

Here are a few facts. He was born in Los Angeles, but grew up in Springfield, Minnesota. Like everyone in my family born in Los Angeles, he was left handed. Those born in Windom were right handed. After high school, he enrolled in the University of Wisconsin Experimental College in Madison. The banner shows him with fellow members of the Theta Xi fraternity (He’s third from the right in the front row). Coincidentally, one of his classmates at the University was a member of the United Nations Smallpox Eradication Program in the 1960s.

Walking the Burma Road

We are back in Kuala Lumpur after four months in Penang. I have not been busy but I have been lazy in posting impressions on those four months. My recovery from cataract surgery completes giving me 3D and depth perception back. I don’t get so tired typing on the notebook computer.

The famous Burma Road was an allied supply artery to China during World War II. Leaving Lashio at the Northern border of Burma (Myanmar), it ran to Kunming and Yunan in China.

In Penang, Jalan Burma (Burma Road) runs from the edge of the Heritage Neighborhood of George Town up to the Mount Erskine area through a district known as Pulau Tikus. Historically, this area was the meeting point of various ethnic groups, cultures, and commerce of Penang Island. It was only a 10 minute walk from our place, so regularly we went exploring along the main thoroughfare and the side streets. We found some famous temples, unique spots to grab takeaway, and the occasional surprise.

Favorite Things – Breakfast and Snacks in Malaysia

Traveling has given us the opportunity to experience some great cuisines, interesting combinations and textures, and many traditional recipes. I have enjoyed the adventure but lately I’m returning to small meals and snacks. In Malaysia, it is really easy to pop in anytime to a Kopitiam coffee shop, food court, or open market for the types of food I really like. Here are some photos that I have collected mostly in the last few months mainly from our stay in Penang.

Two coffees (one black – no sugar, the other with evaporated milk at the bottom). One butter toast with kaya (coconut jam) one local croissant. One half boiled egg (2.5 minutes). Many coffee shops offer this breakfast in Penang.

This shop, Ah Wang Cafe, only opens in the afternoon. One of the best croissants in Malaysia. It’s found in a back alley next to the UDA flats near Tanjung Tokong Beach in Penang.

Here’s breakfast next door to the open market of Brinchang in the Cameron Highlands. In ordering two types of noodles, server asked if we wanted them empty. Saying yes, we just got plain noodles with sauce (mine was very nice curry), and we chose vegetarian add ons such as tofu and tofu skin.

At another market, we found really typical dumplings, the near ones with chopped chives, the far ones with chopped rutabaga. If I order kopi susu (coffee with milk), I like the evaporated milk undisturbed (as they say in Malay).

Upper left: Roti Telur (Grilled Yeast Pancake with Egg served with Dhal), Upper Right: Nasi Lemak (Rice, Sambal spicy sauce, tiny anchovies, peanuts, and half a fried egg, wrapped in banana leaf and paper). Lower: Thosai (crispy crepe of fermented batter served with various curries).

Roti Telur always brings back memories of my first Malaysian breakfast in Kota Kinabalu August 1981.

I’m generally not big on fancy overpriced coffee shops. The exception is Have A Seat Cafe in Penang. Hot milk with espresso ice cubes. Spending an hour and a half experimenting various combinations of milk and sweetness mixed with strong almost cold press coffee taste.

Here is Nasi Goreng American (American Fried Rice). I have found this offered mostly where there are Backpacker Hostels. Not sure what makes it American, possibly adding the frozen mixed vegetables. Not my favorite but my patriotism comes through.

This was a little bakery/cafe located on the third level of the Linc KL Mall in Kuala Lumpur. Secawan Sepiring served their style on deep fried tofu and local cakes.

This is one of the few malls where you can find one of a kind restaurants instead of the usual food chains.

In the Mt. Erskine Market a typical breakfast bowl of noodles with some shredded meat and fish balls. In this case the Penang Laksa Noodles in soup.

The only restaurant I visit regularly is Annalakshimi in the Temple of Fine Arts in Brickfields, Kuala Lumpur. This is a vegan, vegetarian restaurant connected with a dance and performance venue. Always tasty and fresh.

Most of these are not strictly vegetarian. On my journey I have had to include a little bit of animal protein in my diet to insure the balance my metabolism needs.

Market Day in Penang

After living in the Malaysian Highlands of Cameron for a month, we trundled down to the island of Penang, about a 30 minute ferry ride from the mainland. Our trip had a slight detour due to Covid. We expected to cross one of the bridges to the island. As cases are increasing in Malaysia and especially one hotspot in the Southwest of the island, government Conditional Movement Control Order closed both bridges. We were wondering if the ferry would run. Only half the ferries were running but that was enough to get us over and find a taxi to our place. The CMCO limits the range of our activities. Basically, we can go for groceries or takeaway along with daily walks for exercise. A few restaurants offer socially distanced seating. Mostly we try to stay out of harms way. Sometimes, adventure just waits around the corner.

We are staying north of the main city of Georgetown. Our place is near the Erskine Hill market so Saturday we headed there to stock up for the next few days. Afterward, we took a local street back by the fire station that lead to an interesting encounter.

The pride of Mount Erskine Firefighters, Notice the implement in his hand.
What is in this yellow container. It is hissing and not happy.
Just a 120 cm (4 ft) Cobra found in a house near here. Don’t forget to close the windows.
Guess what he had in the back. A knot (I counted 4) of pythons waiting to be returned to the hills.

The cobra will be taken to a veterinarian for health and safety check. Our man with the snakes said after being resettled up in the hills, they’ve had no repeat offenders.

Escape to the Highlands

We escaped from our exile in Spain when the state of emergency was lifted. We found a circuitous route to Malaysia. After quarantine and four covid tests, we had a short stay in Kuala Lumpur. Then, we fled the heat of the city for the slower rhythms of Cameron Highlands arriving the first week of October. This is just a few hours bus ride north of KL, but contrasts with a cool wet climate. Highs around 23º C (75ºF) with mist and rain everyday. After sweltering in the Spanish summer and then in Kuala Lumpur, it took a little time to acclimate.

Our place is halfway between the two main cities of Tanah Rata and Brinchang. What is unique about our month stay is that we have no car. We actually thought we were booking a place near the center of Tanah Rata. As it turned out, this location we have is ideal for walking as we are just 2 km from each city, about 30 minutes walk along paths through villages, beside the Bertam river, along the golf course, by All Souls Church. Wife grew up just 65 km (less than 50 miles) from here. Although the schedule is curtailed due to the Coronavirus pandemic, the Regal bus still runs from Tanah Rata up 20 km to Kampung Raja.

We are near to several jungle trails that lead up to the mountain peaks around the area. Historically, this is the area where Jim Thompson disappeared in 1967. Some of the trails (specifically the one to Parit Falls) are closed due to maintenance and Covid concerns for the wardens. We were able to follow trail 9 to Robinson falls which was quite impressive. Our journey on trail 3 became an adventure when we chose the 1 km trail 2 back to Brinchang. It was 90% vertical climbs through fallen trees and thick brush, real jungle trekking. Thoughts of Jim Thompson crossed our minds.

The Rose Valley Garden provided a nice surprise on one of our outings. We expected to see a few rows of cultivated flowers with a gift shop and then move on. Instead, we spent most of our morning there following trails up the hillside, visiting several different flower displays including cacti, and comparing notes with staff about the tulips in the Netherlands.

Here is the gallery of photos that capture some of our sojourn. Click thumbnail to see full size.

Here are some places we liked with a link to Google Maps (no particular order).

  • Restaurants (with the Covid-19, schedules of many establishments are flexible)
    • Tong Yeng Cafe – Interesting and organized Food Stand, Unique ordering and lunch experience in Tanah Rata
    • Bliss Coffee – Oat Toast with Kaya jam in Kampung Raja
    • Sri Brinchang Curry House for breakfast and Banana Leaf Rice in Tanah Rata, even had vegetarian chicken curry
    • Lord’s Cafe – Scones, small place in the back, upstairs. Friendly and well organized in Tanah Rata
    • Cottage Delight – Our go to place for breakfast noodles before shopping at Brinchang Wet Market.
    • Warung Ikat Tepi – A simple little Malay eatery with delicious real food beside the touristy alleys of Kampung Taman Sedia village.
  • Experiences
    • Rose Valley Garden – Trail and an international mix of flora near Tringkap village
    • Brinchang Wet Market – Our weekly trip to stock up on fresh local produce
    • Bus Station Tanah Rata – Regal bus departs after 8:30 10:30 1:30 4:30 7:30 (Times are for boarding, actual departure is usually 5 – 15 minutes later.
    • Note on trails below: check reviews and online guides for the suitability of hiking. Trail 2 was hard to follow and quite arduous.
    • Trail 3 entrance on left before Arcadia Bungalow. Beyond the junction with Trail 2, it gets rugged.
    • Trail 9 to Robinson Falls, enter through Rainbow Garden Center
  • Touristic
    • Smokehouse Restaurant – British Colonial Experience and Garden
    • 200 Seeds Restaurant (Abang Strawberry) – Nasi Lemak with Strawberry Sambal. This is in the heart of Kampung Taman Sedia, a touristy village with many homestays, restaurants, strawberry themed experiences. There is a shortcut from the Desa Anthurium Apartments beside Building B.
    • Golden Hills Weekend Night Market – Very popular for strawberries and white corn but not that unique experience. Out of the way for us so we only visited once.

How to be a Carioca (step one)

In 1992, Priscilla Ann Goslin published the book How to be a Carioca. We found a discount copy (the cover was printed upside down) when we lived in Brazil during 1994.  Oddly, her biography states she was born near Sand Lake, Minnesota. I’m not sure what that means. Maybe it is a personal joke in her family, or maybe it is a means of keeping anonymity as there are a lot of Sand Lakes. To me, born near Lake Winnibigoshish sounds better.

What one learns from this book is that the Carioca (resident of Rio de Janeiro Brazil) is the original “happy-go-lucky” spirit, where “no” is not an option, “on time” is a concept of Einstein physics, and the letter “s” is pronounced with inflexion.

So the first step to being a Carioca is to go to Rio de Janeiro.  We were there for ten days hitting lots of iconic tourist venues around the Copacabana Beach, Sugar Loaf (Pão de Açucar) and the Corcovado (Christ the Redeemer).  We also met up with our friend Jose Antonio who we had not seen for 25 years.  He took us around to some really interesting spots like the National Library, coffee at the Colombo, unique restaurants. It is his knowledge of so many fascinating stories that made our trip unique and let his Carioca character shine.

Here are a few photos we snapped along the way.

We spent one morning looking at street art in the renovated port area.  Some are just amazing.

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One of the largest murals in the world for the Brazil Olympics

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French Patronage Exhibition

In one typical Carioca outing, JA spontaneously encouraged three others we met in a parking lot to continue up to Pedra Bonita. This twenty minute hike turned out to be a pretty arduous hour climb for me.  We walked down in the night and were trying to figure out how to get back to civilization when a car pulled up and asked us where we wanted to go.  We were six, so five in the back, and one in front (wife crammed on my lap). The driver knew all the best spots to see Rio at night.  It all worked out, even listening to traditional samba, and nothing was planned. In his way, JA knew it would all work out.  Amazing. And the hike? I would do it twice more. New friends, old friends, hang gliders, hidden views, thanks to everyone who made this possible.

Step 2. Go find a Carioca and go with the flow.

 

Grateful

Finishing up in Perth, walking one more time around the city, From Northbridge down near Yanan Square, following King Street to the Rio Tinto Building, over bridges to Elizabeth Quay, then over to Barrack Square,  back through London Court, taking the new connecting bridges from Carillon City to Forrest Chase Square to Perth Train Station to the Art Gallery of WA (Western Australia – Not WA (和) the Japanese cultural concept of “harmony”).

November has been cold for Perth, one of the coldest on record.  Last year, we experienced one of the coldest Octobers on record.  I guess we are just lucky.  Nothing even close to freezing, but most places are set up for sizzling summers in 35-40 deg C range (95-105 deg F).

One last restaurant to try was the Annalakshmi on the Swan at Barrack Square by Elizabeth Quay. It overlooks the harbor, serves Indian buffet everyday. Patron’s pay what they feel. I just took a small spoonful to taste and yet was stuffed. Walked all the way up to Northbridge afterward.

This place exists in a central tourist spot with a beautiful view. Knowing that there is a place like this just inspires me.  I was happy to pay what I felt.

 

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Simple Vegan fare with Cumin Water

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Coffee and a pudding overlooking the Red Baron biplane

 

 

More Gardens, More Parks

One of the delights of Perth is coming across private homes with stunning gardens.  Marvelous is the word that comes to my mind looking at the stunning colors and the detailed planning and cultivation. Here are highlights of our last few days that were favored with some clear blue skies.

Besides catching the free CAT blue line bus in Russell Square, we wandered around the waterfront between Elizabeth Quay, the Convention Center, and Barack Square and Jetty.

The bleak environment of Heirisson Island is a contrast to the gardens.  We walked the entire island in late morning.  It may be possible to see Kangaroos in the reserve earlier in the day.

 

 

Perth: What’s not to Love

Two weeks in our neighborhood discovering.  Every walk is an adventure.

We stay in a converted brewery that is a 20 min walk to Hyde Park.  Other directions take us to Stuart Street Reserve, Ivy Park, or Russell Square. The free CAT buses are really convenient.  Sometimes we walk out and take a short bus trip home.

 

The streets are filled with interesting art and unique coffee shops.

Here are links to some of our favorites:

Places that we enjoyed twice:

And finally, one of the best natural food stores in the world:

Kakulas Brothers has bulk foods that allow us to purchase just what we need for our limited time at very reasonable prices, better than many popular grocery stores.

What’s not to love?

 

 

 

 

The Accidental Vegan

An inspiration for this post comes from noneuclideansofa blog. I enjoy his observations on life and living.

An inspiration for the vegan traveler is the Cook the Beans blog: Ubud on a Scooter and Punkin Soup are recent posts.

I should probably create an entire blog about my journey and transformation into a Vegan.  Devra Gartenstein already wrote a recipe book called Accidental Vegan. It is hard to know where to start, what to tell, and how to avoid boring my audience.

Growing up in a small town in Minnesota in the 1950’s and 60’s, pizza and McDonald’s were exotic foods.  Here are some memories and influences.

  • My mother teaching me how to eat with chop sticks when I was 12 years old.
  • My introduction to tacos and Tabasco sauce at a Foreign Exchange Student conference.
  • Katherine Gustafson and all the friends from around the world who met at her house on Saturday evenings.  Many interesting foods.
  • Frances Moore’s Diet for a Small Planet that taught how to get complete proteins from grains and legumes.
  • Living a year without meat.
  • Traveling the world and discovering oysters, raw fish, uncooked steak tartare, and cannibal toast made with uncooked pork.
  • Finding more vegetarian and natural food restaurants in America. I’m thinking of the Mud Pie on Lyndale and Seward Cafe on Franklin.
  • Discovering Asian vegetarian cuisines in Japan, Malaysia, along with India.
  • Discovering I am allergic to eggs; later finding that I’m less sensitive to duck eggs (The difference between jungle fowl and waterfowl).
  • Reducing meat and cheese in the diet to control gout.

In Turkey this July and August, my joints began really hurting, first pelvis, then shoulder, then toes, then wrist.  In Ankara, the good doctor diagnosed rheumatoid arthritis. Her prescription: Some vitamins and no more meat, chicken, fish, or milk products.  Not even fat free yogurt. Eggs were OK, but with my allergies: I’m a Vegan.

Ethically, I’m happy with the result.  Physically, all the pain is gone, only an occasional tightness in the shoulder.

In the past 6 months, it was easier to find Vegan options in tourist areas: Siem Reap Cambodia, Chiang Mai and Chiang Rai in Thailand, Amman Jordan, Cairo Egypt, and Kuala Lumpur Malaysia. Myanmar/Burma, Mongolia, Turkey, and Tunisia were hard. Many Vegetarian options have eggs or cheese. I’m flexible when necessary.

Here are some particularly delicious meals:

 

Answers from previous post:

  1. For leeches, a little salt makes them fall right off.  A mixture of liquid soap or detergent and salt rubbed on the shoes makes a good prevention.
  2. For first aid, Wife always carries bandages, neosporin ointment, airline wetwipe packets, a Swiss Army card with scissors, tweezers, toothpick, file.
  3. We did not enter the Buddhist Sri Dalada Maligawa Temple, Temple of the Sacred Tooth Relic. We walked around the outside looking for hiking trails and viewed it from a distant hill.

Some Vege trivia:

  1. Who is my favorite Vegetarian Playwright?
  2. Who is my favorite Vegetarian Political Activist?
  3. Who is my favorite Vegetarian Saxophonist?
  4. Who is my favorite Vegetarian Beatle?
  5. Who is my abhorred Vegetarian Fascist?

Kuala Lumpur Ennui

Over the last year, we have stopped over in Kuala Lumpur several times for family events and personal pursuits.  Recently, we have tried to find some less common venues involving city walks.  It is steaming (and when it rains, streaming) in KL and never ending construction forces us into the streets as we approach our quest.

Prime Minister Memorials and the Bank Negara Museum and Art Gallery.

We took the free Red GOKL bus from KL Sentral and exiting at Menara DBKL (City Hall Tower).  A walk up Jalan Raja Laut (street) to LRT station Bandaraya arrives at a foot bridge to KTM station Bank Negara. Either of these stations are also good starting points for the walk north up Jalan Dato Onn and circling west to the Memorials for the first prime minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra, and third prime minister, Tun Hussein Onn.  These huge buildings are stuffed with mementos about the accomplishments but shy away from controversy.

Across the road is Bank Negara (National Bank) which has an extensive art gallery and museum with no entry fee.  Bags are not allowed but the information desk has tokens for the lockers.

The works are technically well done but tend to show an idealized village.  Here are few inspirations that bend the rules.

KLCC-Bukit Bintang Walk

A 3-4 km walk I took several times starts at the Avenue K Shopping Mall at the KLCC LRT stop.  This goes underground from Avenue K via (tunnel 1) Suria KLCC Mall to the Convention Center (tunnel 2), then via elevated Walkways (skyway 3) to the Pavilion Shopping Mall.  From there, a tunnel (4) connects under Jalan Bukit Bintang to the Fahrenheit88 Shopping Mall. Exiting on ground floor by Shoopen and walking along Jalan Bukit Bintang about 30 meters arrives at the down escalator (5) into the Lot10 Hutong basement restaurants.  From here, escalators up to second floor of the Lot10 shopping mall access the skywalk (6)  from H&M  or Isetan leading under the monorail over to the Sungei Wang Plaza.  Except for 30 meters, this entire route is protected from sun and rain.

Here’s a map from Google that I annotated with numbered pathways.  Brown lines are underground, Green lines are Skyways.

KLCC-SungeiWang Path

River of Life

Masjid Jamek (the Jamek Mosque) marks the confluence of the Klang and Gombak Rivers where Kuala Lumpur (meaning Muddy confluence) gets its name. These rivers run through the heart of Kuala Lumpur.  A new program plans to beautify the area by cleaning up the rivers and erecting walkways along the banks.  It is quite impressive around the Jamek Mosque in the evening.

Cats and Bikes

To complete this post, Kuala Lumpur has many cats and many oBikes, a station free bicycle sharing system.  Here are a few photos of each. I have an oBike account and use them frequently when public transportation does not have a direct route.


 

 

Artifacts 2: Rain Jacket

I thought about sharing some of the lessons learned from our travels. One direction on this path involves what we carry. This is a theme I have touched on before.  It is interesting to me to experience how the artifacts both physical and electronic define the modern self and its relationship to its environment. No tips and tricks here except to keep experimenting and be observant.

Our rain jackets are essential for any trip. Beyond keeping dry and warm, they offer freedom to explore even during bad weather.  This has led us to many interesting discoveries and appreciations of the neighborhoods we visit.

My simple jacket folds itself neatly into a zippered pouch which I store in an outside compartment of my bag for easy access (see below). Sometimes, it stays stowed for a month. Here I remember Malta, Kuala Lumpur and Cape Town.  At the other extreme, I wore it every day in Vancouver.

 

 

 

My photos provide more of a documentary experience than an artistic one. Over the past seventeen years, this raincoat became a central theme of my travels and showed up in way too many photos.

RainCoat1

 

 

Yarrow Tea

A little diversion from my usual posting.  Rest assured, I am not starting a food blog. I am thinking about tips for the trip type postings.

This started with an expedition to our local MegaImage grocery store looking for tea. There I found a line of teas produced in Romania so I randomly chose one called Coada-Soricelului.  On returning home, Master Google informed me that it was Yarrow Tea well known for analgesic qualities.  Perfect, as I have been nursing soreness in the knees since Mexico.

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When Daughter came out, I told her about my discovery of Yarrow Tea.  She responded, “Oh you mean, Achillea millefolium, used by Achilles warriors to staunch wounds?”

“Umm, yes,” trying to hide my ignorance and sneaking a look farther down the Google page.  For her, the story begins in the summer of 2008 in the back seat of our Honda Accord as we drove around the Eastern US.  She bought an herb dictionary about three inches thick from a bookstore at the University of Purdue, in West Lafayette, Indiana.  Alphabetically Achillea was one of the first entries. I can only guess how many times she read through that book entry by entry.

Looking back at all our photos from that trip, I see none from Purdue nor with her book. The best I found was the banner photo on the border of Maine.  For now, we are doing well as we finish up in Bucharest drinking Yarrow tea, St. Johns Wort tea (Sunatoare – hyperici herba) and Peppermint tea (Ceai de Menta – Menthae Herba).